UKZN Graduates its First Postgraduate Supernumerary as a Specialist in Emergency Medicine

UKZN Graduates its First Postgraduate Supernumerary as a Specialist in Emergency Medicine
Master of Medicine graduate, Dr Nahyan AL Mansoori.

Dr Nahyan Al Mansoori received his Master of Medicine (MMed) in Emergency Medicine from UKZN, and a Fellowship in Emergency Medicine from the College of Medicine of South Africa.

He is the first supernumerary to graduate from the Discipline of Emergency Medicine at UKZN, and also the first UKZN graduate from the United Arab Emirates.

Said 34-year-old Mansoori: ‘There is a global shortage of specialists in Emergency Medicine, which is sad, because it is the gateway for community members to access health care.

‘My study experience at UKZN was amazing. The staff were very helpful and responded promptly to all my enquiries. I am hoping to further my experience as an Emergency Medicine Specialist, and aiming to find my way into subspecialising in critical care medicine.’

Acting Academic Head, Dr Sharadh Garach, commended Mansoori, commenting that the transition from another healthcare system to the South African system is often quite difficult. ‘Dr Nahyan Al Mansoori displayed exceptional dedication and commitment to the programme, and we are very pleased and proud to have seen him succeed and graduate.’

Words: Lihle Sosibo

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

Managing Pain Control in Children with Burns and Trauma in Hospitals

Managing Pain Control in Children with Burns and Trauma in Hospitals
General surgeon, Dr Shelley Lynn Wall.

‘It wasn’t an easy journey, but I am proud to have completed a PhD,’ said Dr Shelley Lynn Wall on obtaining her PhD in Medicine (General Surgery).

Her study examined why children with burns do not receive adequate pain management and ways to overcome these obstacles to achieve optimal pain control for these already traumatised children.

‘I am hoping to get more involved in clinical research that can bring about meaningful change in the management of burn patients in low and medium-income countries (LMICs),’ she said.

Wall is a general surgeon and Burns Consultant at Edendale Hospital in Pietermaritzburg. She grew up in Boksburg, Gauteng and matriculated at Boksburg High School. She completed her MMed as part of her training as a general surgeon.

She is currently busy with local clinical research projects relevant to burns management in KwaZulu-Natal and is also part of international collaborative projects aimed at improving burn care and burn research in LMICs.

During her PhD project, she realised that she really enjoyed statistics and wanted to become more proficient. She has enrolled for a one-year Certificate in Medical Statistics through Stanford University.

Said Wall, ‘I had my second child a month after registering for my PhD. Juggling two small children, a full-time job as a burns surgeon and trying to complete a PhD was quite a challenge. Finding time to get to everything was hard but being as organised as possible, setting goals, and deadlines and sticking to them as far as possible, made it possible to complete my PhD. I am also exceptionally lucky that my husband was very supportive of my PhD journey and I also had a great deal of support from my supervisor and co-supervisor. I am one of the UKZN DRILL Fellows and I also received a great deal of support from the DRILL team and the other DRILL Fellows.’

Wall strongly believes that clinicians are in a unique position to conduct meaningful research to improve patient management, yet most clinicians, unless compelled to because they need to complete a MMed, avoid research. ‘I think this is because they are scared of it and have no idea where to start. It’s really important for clinicians to be upskilled in the field of research.’

Words: Lihle Sosibo

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

Visually Impaired Physiotherapist Graduates with Master’s Degree Cum Laude

Visually Impaired Physiotherapist Graduates with Master’s Degree <em>Cum Laude</em>
Mr Meluleki Thethwayo graduated with a Master’s in Physiotherapy cum laude.

Visually impaired Physiotherapist, Mr Meluleki Thethwayo, who is based in Ngwelezane Hospital in northern KwaZulu-Natal, graduated with a Master of Physiotherapy degree cum laude.

His study titled: Interprofessional Collaboration between Clinicians in the Intensive Care Unit Setting, aimed to explore the collaborative relationship among the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) clinician in order to understand the teamwork dynamics that are practiced in this setting to improve the quality of patient care.

Thethwayo began his journey at UKZN in 2015 and encountered a number of challenges: ‘University life has not been easy. I struggled to see the projector screen, use a microscope and read patients’ files in hospital. I sometimes felt like giving up,’ he said.

Through faith, family, friends and strong support from his supervisors Dr Stacy Lawler and Professor Verusia Chetty, he overcame these challenges and pursued his master’s degree. ‘Without my supportive team, I would never have been successful in my academic pursuits,’ said Thethwayo.

‘He adhered to every task and time frame impeccably, giving of his best at each attempt at his work and graciously accepting correction. Meluleki was a model student. He displayed a delicate balance of interest and curiosity with unwavering diligence and modesty. It was such an honour to be a part of his development,’ said Lawler.

The 24-year old who hails from Emchakweni in Mtubatuba experienced vision issues from a young age. In 2013, he was declared sight impaired and diagnosed with Retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma and cataracts.

Thethwayo highlighted the significant role religion has played in his life and encouraged others, saying, ‘There is nothing that is impossible with God. One always needs to have faith and be determined.’

Thethwayo is excited about his future plans as he wishes to enroll in a doctoral programme at UKZN and one day join the ranks of academia.

Words: Mandisa Shozi

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

PhD Study Focuses on Intimate Partner Violence

PhD Study Focuses on Intimate Partner Violence
PhD scholarship recipient, Dr Mengistu Meskele Koyira.

Dr Mengistu Meskele Koyira was awarded a PhD in Public Health for his study on Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) against Women Living with and without HIV: Contexts and Associated Factors in Wolaita Zone, Ethiopia.

The study was supervised by Dr Nelisiwe Khuzwayo and Professor Myra Taylor.

Koyira said that this was the first study to compare IPV among HIV positive and HIV negative women and health care workers’ screening for IPV in Ethiopia. ‘The research identified various factors associated with IPV and women’s terrifying experiences of violence. The findings highlight the urgent need for interventions such as more gender-equitable policies. Healthcare worker and health system-related challenges were also identified in screening for IPV.

‘I am extremely happy to receive this apex degree. I plan to continue to conduct research and supervise students to assist the community by identifying health and health-related problems and preventing disease,’ he said.

Koyira is an academic staff member at Wolaita Sodo University, Ethiopia. ‘Teaching in a Higher Education Institution demands a PhD. I also wanted to hone my research skills and pass these on to my students. The skills I gained will enable me to apply for research grants to further my research and serve poor communities in Africa. I want to thank UKZN for the PhD scholarship,’ he added. He also thanked the University for hosting an online graduation ceremony as COVID-19 would not have allowed him to travel to South Africa.

‘I am grateful to my supervisors; they taught me superbly. They were both supportive and helped me in all aspects of my PhD journey. Communication at every UKZN office was excellent and supportive,’ said Koyira.

Words: Nombuso Dlamini

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

Sport Science Lecturer Awarded PhD

Sport Science Lecturer Awarded PhD
PhD graduate in Health Sciences, Dr Patrick Mkhanyiseli Zimu.

Lecturer in the Discipline of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences (BELS), Dr Patrick Mkhanyiseli Zimu graduated with a PhD in Health Sciences (Sport Science).

‘This is an exciting and great achievement, not only for me but my family and my entire community,’ said Zimu. ‘I intend to continue to study with the aim of becoming a National Research Foundation (NRF)-rated researcher and obtaining full professorship.’

His study aimed to develop an intervention programme to curb sedentary lifestyles and promote physical activity among adolescents, particularly in rural and township communities. ‘The research measured current health behaviours and stages of change in adolescents and provided tailor-made intervention strategies that focus on behaviour change and promotion of physical activity,’ said Zimu. The programme (Nyakaza - move-for-health) produced significant changes in physical activity levels, body mass and cardiorespiratory fitness levels among participants.

‘The study targeted a hard-to-reach population (adolescents), and there were many challenges in terms of getting them to participate. However, through forging partnerships with various sectors of the community, I managed to work with the group,’ he added.

Zimu said that the study is a novel contribution to the promotion of public health: ‘To the best of my knowledge, this is the first study describing the systematic development of a community-school linked physical activity intervention to stimulate physical activity among adolescents.’

He described his PhD journey as challenging, but a good learning experience. It was difficult to obtain funding; however, support from the NRF and the College of Health Sciences ensured successful completion of his study. The Young Researchers’ Development programmes offered by UKZN and the University Capacity Development Programmes (UCDP) capacitated him with the necessary skills to conduct his research.

Zimu is from KwaSwayimana on the outskirts of Pietermaritzburg and he completed his matric at Masijabule High School.

Words: Nombuso Dlamini

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

Reversing the Progression of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Reversing the Progression of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
Dr Kibwe Mwewa the first UKZN student to conduct a monocrotalline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) rat model study.

Dr Kibwe Mwewa was awarded a PhD in Medical Sciences (Physiology) for his study that suggests that administration of Salidroside in the early and later stages of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is effective in reducing its progression.

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic, progressive disease characterised by pulmonary vascular resistance elevation of artery pressure, which ultimately results in right ventricular failure, hypertrophy, and death. Current therapy for PAH usually has adverse side effects; hence Mwewa’s interest in identifying natural substances with cardioprotective potential. He was the first student to conduct a monocrotalline-induced PAH rat model study at the Biomedical Research Unit at UKZN.

Born in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mwewa holds a Bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Science from the University of Lubumbashi, a BSc Honours in Medical Physiology, a Master’s in Medical Sciences (Cardiophysiology) from UKZN and an Advanced Diploma in Nutritional Therapy from Oxford University (United Kingdom).

He is the founder and director of Nutritional Heart Therapy, an online clinic that assists people to prevent and reverse high blood pressure and heart disease by switching to a whole food plant diet.

Amongst the challenges he encountered during his studies was the language barrier as he is French speaking and had to work extra hard to improve his English.

‘I had a good experience at UKZN with the help of my supervisors, Dr Anand Nadar and Professor Mahendra Lala Channa who made it easy for me through their guidance. I am very grateful to them,’ said Mwewa.

Words: Lihle Sosibo

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

Promoting Indigenous Health Systems

Promoting Indigenous Health Systems
Dr Nompumelelo Mbatha graduated with a PhD in Traditional Medicine.

‘I feel honoured to have had an opportunity to explore the less travelled terrain of Indigenous Health Systems,’ said Dr Nompumelelo Mbatha following her graduation with a PhD in Traditional Medicine.

‘This has been a very humbling experience which allowed me to understand and value the role played by African culture, spirituality and the indigenous health system in our South African health system,’ she added.

‘Having been initiated as a Traditional Health Practitioner, I wanted to understand the comprehensive dynamics and challenges involved in traditional healing practice and the potential role one could play in contributing to academic development and empirical knowledge for institutional development,’ she explained.

Mbatha’s study investigated Traditional Healing training methods to develop a framework for accredited training based on Traditional Healer Practice in KwaZulu-Natal.

‘The findings outlined learning methods, content, and core competencies critical to Traditional Health Practitioner training and a framework for training accreditation. At least three publications were achieved from this work. The study adds to the limited empirical data on traditional healer training systems and creates an opportunity to develop a credible indigenous training programme for practitioners,’ Mbatha explained. She said her future plans include using the accreditation framework to develop such programmes.

Mbatha said academic development and financial support from UKZN enabled her to successfully complete her study. ‘I must add that the academic support came with a stringent focus on academic excellence that enabled my optimal development.’ She is currently busy with her fourth publication from her study.

Words: Nombuso Dlamini

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

TB during Pregnancy Can Cause Autism - Study Finds

TB during Pregnancy Can Cause Autism - Study Finds
PhD in Physiology recipient, Dr Wadzanai Manjeese.

Dr Wadzanai Manjeese was awarded a PhD in Physiology - Neuroscience for her study on the impact of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (M. TB) infection on brain development. The study found that TB during pregnancy can impair foetal brain development, causing developmental delays and Autism-related phenotypes later in life.

This was the first study to explore the association between M. TB and Autism Spectrum Disorder. The findings are novel and important in understanding the complex aetiology of Autism.

‘What a milestone! This PhD is by far the most difficult journey I’ve embarked on in my career. There were so many obstacles and slippery mountains to climb along the way. I lost my brother during my doctoral studies and, as I found it difficult to strike a balance between research and grieving, I took a break. COVID-19 hit and my research came to another long halt. Attaining this degree makes up for the hardships and being the first in my family to achieve this milestone gives me great joy. The PhD has already launched me on an exciting research career as a post-doctoral research fellow at the Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI),’ said 31-year-old Manjeese.

Manjeese was born and raised in Zimbabwe, where she received a BSc Honours’ degree in Biotechnology from Chinhoyi University of Technology and a Master’s degree in Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology from the National University of Science and Technology. Her lack of exposure to the latest science infrastructure motivated her decision to enrol for PhD studies with UKZN. ‘Designing and executing the study was difficult given that I did not have a background in neuroscience and I was pursuing it at such an advanced level,’ said Manjeese. She initially registered for a PhD in Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases; however, two months into that programme, she stumbled on a research opportunity that not only offered new skills but merged medical microbiology and neuroscience.

Manjeese said that her study experience at UKZN was a great one and thanked the University for the opportunities and financial support it offered her, as she also received financial support from the College of Health Sciences. She expressed her thanks to her supervisors, Dr Thabisile Mpofana; Dr Nontobeko Mvubu, and Professor Adrie J C Steyn.

‘Above everything, God crowned me with grace, wisdom and the strength to prosper in this endeavour. Friends and family, thank you for contributing to my success in many ways. I am deeply humbled,’ she added.

Words: Lihle Sosibo

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

Traditional Medicine Shows Potential to Treat Breast Cancer

Traditional Medicine Shows Potential to Treat Breast Cancer
Mr Siboniso Sithole, who holds a Master’s in Medical Sciences.

Mr Siboniso Sithole was awarded a Master’s degree in Medical Sciences (Anatomy) for his study that investigated the immunomodulatory and anticancer effect of traditional medicine on breast cancer cells. The research found that the traditional medicine used induced immunomodulatory through changes in cytokines secretion.

It thus has the potential to be developed and optimised for treatment of breast cancer.

‘The Master’s programme gave me the opportunity to conduct research that could change the lives of cancer patients and traditional healers. I am excited to have conducted research that validates the safety and efficacy of traditional medicine against cancer,’ said Sithole.

He added that completing a Master’s degree at UKZN was a dream come true and expressed his gratitude to his supervisor, Dr Mlungisi Ngcobo for his support. He hopes to register for a PhD at UKZN.

Hailing from Bergville in KwaZulu-Natal, Sithole completed his matric at Ekwaluseni High School. He is currently working as a temporary teacher assistant in the Department of Education.

The 29-year-old said his studies were affected by the national lockdown, but the University mitigated this challenge by providing laptops and data for students. ‘It was great studying at UKZN. The lecturers and lab managers were very supportive and available for consultations.’

Words: Lihle Sosibo

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

Health Train Clinic Manager Awarded Master’s Degree

Health Train Clinic Manager Awarded Master’s Degree
An elated Ms Londeka Noxolo Zulu was awarded a Master’s in Optometry.

Transnet Foundation and Phelophepa Health Train Eye Clinic Manager Ms Londeka Noxolo Zulu was awarded a Master’s in Optometry.

‘I am excited about finally completing my Master’s. It is a stepping stone as I am hoping to enrol for a PhD in Optometry in the near future,’ she said.

Zulu, who has been practicing as an Optometrist for almost 10 years in the private and public sectors said that, over the years, she became aware of the need to investigate the challenges confronting delivery of eye care in South Africa, especially in the public sector, and to identify possible solutions.

Supervised by Dr Diane Van Staden, she explored undergraduate Optometry students’ perceptions and experiences of public eye care services in the country. The study found that most of the students held negative views and were skeptical about working in the public sector after graduation.

‘Similar studies have been conducted in other disciplines, but at the time, no similar study could be found for Optometry,’ said Zulu.

Juggling a career, family life and her studies was challenging and the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic were a serious challenge.

‘Guidance from my supervisor and support from my family and friends helped me to persevere and see my studies through,’ she said.

The Phelophepa Health Train 1 project (a Transnet CSI project) delivers primary health care services to rural and semi-rural communities across South Africa. A 19-coach train was converted into a mobile clinic that houses health, psychology, dental and eye clinics.

Zulu hails from a small rural town called KwaHlabisa in northern KwaZulu-Natal and completed her matric at Somfula High School.

‘Having done my undergraduate qualification at UKZN I was familiar with the Institution. However, I was even more impressed with the Postgraduate Office. The staff is extremely helpful and supportive. I wouldn’t hesitate to do other programmes with UKZN in the future,’ she said.

Words: Nombuso Dlamini

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

Master’s for Study on Tooth Enamel

Master’s for Study on Tooth Enamel
Mr Lesley Naidoo received a Master’s degree in Dentistry.

‘I am blessed and I hope to pursue a PhD on the protection of tooth enamel,’ said Mr Lesley Naidoo after he graduated with a Master’s degree in Dentistry.

Supervised by Professor Shenuka Singh, his study was titled, Evaluating the Erosive Effect of Sour Candy on Human Tooth Enamel.

‘The research evaluated the erosive potential of sour candy in comparison with its regular counterpart at different times of exposure. The findings suggest that frequent, long-term consumption of sour candy may have a negative impact on teeth as they are highly erosive,’ explained Naidoo.

He found a need in his community and a dental practice. It took him some time, however he was able to demonstrate his findings in both local and international research publications.

He is currently developing a digital application for proactive dental care and is also doing part-time Theology studies at the South African Theological Seminary (SATS).

Words: Nombuso Dlamini

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

Research on Pharmaceutical Expenditure Leads to Masters in Pharmacy

Research on Pharmaceutical Expenditure Leads to Masters in Pharmacy
Master of Pharmacy degree holder, Ms Lirosha Moodley.

‘I wish to use my skills acquired to do further research and promote research in my workplace - community healthcare,’ said an elated Pharmacy supervisor, Ms Lirosha Moodley after she graduated with a Master of Pharmacy degree.

‘I love my current job, but I felt that I needed to develop and grow in other areas,’ said the visibly excited Moodley.

She said balancing a full-time job and completing a degree was a bit challenging, ‘I created a timetable for work and study times. I also found conducting qualitative research challenging, but it was quite rewarding seeing the process through.’

Moodley’s research was on healthcare budgeting and its translation into pharmaceutical expenditure in South Africa. ‘The research documented the knowledge and participation of pharmaceutical services in the budget process in South Africa,’ she explained.

She is currently a Pharmacy supervisor and hopes to strengthen her supervision, management and leadership skills.

Words: Nombuso Dlamini

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

PhD Study Explores Alternative Treatment for Diabetes

PhD Study Explores Alternative Treatment for Diabetes
Dr Bonisiwe Precious Mbatha aspires to be a trailblazer in science and innovation.

Dr Bonisiwe Precious Mbatha was awarded a PhD in Medical Sciences (Physiology) for her study that explored whether a new transition metal complex (Dioxidovanadium) could be used as an alternative treatment for diabetes by comparing its effects to those of insulin, which is the standard drug to treat diabetes mellitus.

Diabetic patients often suffer from kidney and heart complications despite using insulin therapy. The study investigated if vanadium complex would lower blood glucose and alleviate diabetes-associated complications such as renal and cardiovascular dysfunction. The results showed that the complex was effective in lowering blood glucose in diabetic rats and was not toxic.

Mbatha is currently serving as Acting School Operations Manager in the School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences at UKZN. For her PhD study, she and her research group worked with the Department of Chemistry to synthesise the new complex using organic ligands to eliminate toxicity and improve efficacy. The research group has published three papers in international journals with a fourth under review.

She said, ‘I am happy and proud of this accomplishment. It’s been a challenging journey. From the time I enrolled for an honours degree and through my master’s and PhD I worked full time and studied at night due to financial constraints, while raising two children.’ She added that she learnt to manage her time properly and lean on others for support. Mbatha expressed her gratitude to her supportive supervisors, Drs Phikelelani Ngubane (UKZN), Andile Khathi (UKZN), and Ntethelelo Sibiya (Rhodes University).

‘People think that when you graduate with a PhD, you have made it or it’s the end of the journey. It is actually the beginning because now you have to apply the knowledge and expertise you’ve obtained and build something. My biggest aspiration is to expose the youth, especially those that come from disadvantaged backgrounds like myself, to the beauty of science. I aspire to be among the trailblazers in science and innovation. As to in what capacity, that is yet to be determined,’ said Mbatha.

Words: Lihle Sosibo

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

PhD Study Tackles Infectious Diseases

PhD Study Tackles Infectious Diseases
Dr Babita Kushwaha graduated with a PhD in Pharmaceutical Chemistry.

‘It is a great achievement and I am feeling very happy. My future aspiration is to become a successful researcher,’ said Dr Babita Kushwaha on graduating with a PhD in Pharmaceutical Chemistry.

Supervised by Professor Rajshekhar Karpoormath, her study was titled, Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Linezolid Derivatives as Potential Anti-tubercular and Antimicrobial Agents.

‘Infectious diseases (via microbial infections) have challenged humankind for centuries and account for many deaths around the world due to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. Resistance to anti-tubercular drugs has worsened an already bad situation. My study thus aimed to identify linezolid-like molecules as potential antimicrobial and anti-tubercular agents,’ she explained.

Kushwaha said that, while she encountered a number of challenges during the study, she was able to overcome them and succeed with hard work and her supervisor’s assistance.

Words: Nombuso Dlamini

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

PhD Graduate Seeks to Make a Difference

PhD Graduate Seeks to Make a Difference
PhD graduate, Dr Majeed Ganai.

‘This is a really proud moment for me,’ said Dr Majeed Ganai who graduated with a PhD in Pharmaceutical Chemistry.

‘It was a challenge for all students to complete their work on time during COVID-19,’ he added.

Supervised by Professor Raj Karpoormath, Ganai synthesised new compounds for the treatment of cancer. ‘I discovered some compounds which were active against cancer cell lines,’ he said. ‘I learnt many techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR) and X-ray spectroscopy, which were completely new to me.’ He is currently conducting postdoctoral research at the University of Ioannina in Greece. He is learning biological testing and designing more compounds to test against cancer. Ganai said that he hopes to one day become a professor.

‘I have always wanted to contribute good things to the world and Pharmaceutical Chemistry is one of the subjects which can make it possible. Designing drug like compounds and testing them against lethal diseases promotes drug discovery and development,’ he explained. 

He has already published some of his research papers with assistance from his supervisor.

He remarked that he enjoyed his time at UKZN. ‘UKZN has excellent facilities for any kind of study with great technical staff. The University provides one with space to think out of the box and helps to improve one’s skills.’

Words: Nombuso Dlamini

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .

Doctoral Study Designs Model for Patient-Centred Care

Doctoral Study Designs Model for Patient-Centred Care
Dr Adepeju Lateef (left) with her supervisor, Dr Mbali Mhlongo.

Dr Adepeju Lateef was awarded a PhD in Nursing for her study that developed a Patient-Centred Care (PCC) model to enhance nursing care and improve the quality of primary healthcare service delivery.

Supervised by Dr Mbali Mhlongo, the study was titled, Analysis of Nurses’ Perceptions on the Utilisation of Patient-Centred Care in Selected Primary Health Care Settings in Osun state, South-west Nigeria: A Qualitative Study.

Lateef said that, despite acknowledgment of the role played by PCC in achieving universal health coverage, nurses in primary healthcare settings confront many challenges in its implementation. This motivated her to develop a PCC implementation model that equips healthcare workers with the knowledge required to provide patient-centred services at primary, secondary and tertiary levels of the healthcare system.

Lateef added that the study’s findings will contribute to the achievement of the World Health Organization’s agenda of achieving universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals.

She said that, while her PhD journey was challenging, ‘I thank God for a supportive and understanding supervisor, Dr Mhlongo was always there to encourage me not to give up.’

Words: Nombuso Dlamini

Photograph: Supplied


author : .
author email : .