Humanities Academics Part of International Ground-breaking Research Project

Humanities Academics Part of International Ground-breaking Research Project
From left: Professors Federico Settler, Maheshvari Naidu and Simangaliso Kumalo, and Dr Beatrice Okyere-Manu.Click here for isiZulu version

Four academics from the College of Humanities, Professors Federico Settler, Maheshvari Naidu and Simangaliso Kumalo, and Dr Beatrice Okyere-Manu are part of a large transdisciplinary ground-breaking research project conceptualised by the International Research Training Group (IRTG). They aim to establish a transdisciplinary and transcontinental research dialogue on religion as a site of social transformation.

The Project was awarded funding of approximately R82 million by the South African National Research Foundation (NRF) and the German Research Community (DFG) over five years, starting in January 2022. It is the culmination of a prolonged period of application development and effort by the College of Humanities team and collaborators in Germany and South Africa.

This Project is the second IRTG in the history of German-South African academic cooperation, and currently the only German IRTG in cooperation with an African country, as well as the first to focus on issues of religion.

For the next five years, the IRTG will present the opportunity for extended transdisciplinary research training of up to 54 doctoral candidates under the guidance of more than 20 interdisciplinary principal and associate researchers from a variety of academic disciplines through the cooperation of four academic institutions: three of which are South African, namely, Stellenbosch University, the University of the Western Cape, UKZN and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (FRG). This research will be implemented in four thematic fields: nationalism, migration, development and healing.

Overall coordination of the Project is managed by four chairpersons including Professors Torsten Meireis and Regina Römhild from Humboldt University, Professor Jeremy Punt from Stellenbosch University and UKZN’s Professor Federico Settler.

Settler explained that: ‘Starting in January 2022, the project will appoint a cohort of six doctoral researchers to join UKZN, with two further rounds of doctoral appointments due before 2025. Doctoral proposals will be accepted across four thematic areas: nationalism, development, migration and healing. To supervise these projects, the IRTG brings together 22 leading researchers from the four partner institutions to provide high-quality supervision and teaching at doctoral level. Every doctoral researcher will be supported through a series of seminars, supervision, and professional training and they will participate in a semester exchange to one of the partner institutions - all funded by the project grant.’

Dean and Head of the School of Religion, Philosophy and Classics Professor David Spurrett said, ‘This is a tremendous achievement, owing a great deal to the extraordinary work that went into preparing the application and steering it through the rounds of evaluation. I thank and heartily congratulate the College of Humanities team.’

Okyere-Manu commented that, ‘Since this is a collaborative effort between four universities, candidates will have the opportunity to be supervised and mentored by a transcontinental and transdisciplinary team of researchers. I am particularly excited about the co-supervision and research collaboration opportunity that IRTG makes possible with both local and international academics.’

Naidu, one of the four participating researchers from UKZN said that the application process was protracted and extremely comprehensive and gave full credit to the intellectual strength and diverse expertise of the interdisciplinary team. ‘The recent successful announcement of the application is cause for celebration as it is a huge grant that will fund a large cohort of South African and German PhDs,’ she said.

Her collaboration is in the research area of religion and healing with her roots in South Asian religions, Anthropology of Religion and Gender and Religion. ‘The sub-focus on healing in African, Buddhist and Hindu contexts is exciting, especially as it allows a probing of varying situated interpretations of illness and health and local healing practices. Research projects within this area will explore the entanglements between healing concepts and processes, migration of people, materials and knowledge, nation-building, “morality” and religion in the contemporary world, focusing on Germany/Europe and South Africa,’ explained Naidu.

Kumalo said: ‘I am excited by this news and very grateful to my colleagues for the collaborative work we have done to get this substantial funding. I see this as an opportunity to train a substantial number of doctoral candidates for the next five years. Most importantly, for some of us at UKZN to be part of a cohort of well-respected internal researchers’ places UKZN on the map of leading international research institutions. As a Public Theologian I am looking forward to contributing to the production of situated knowledge which will be used as a resource for social transformation.’

For more information about the IRTG on Transformative Religion and doctoral applications, visit the project website here.

Words: Melissa Mungroo

Photographs: Supplied


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Graduate Engineer of the Year Harnessing Engineering to Make a Difference

Graduate Engineer of the Year Harnessing Engineering to Make a Difference
Ms Naadira Ballim.Click here for isiZulu version

Ms Naadira Ballim, a graduate of the School of Engineering and civil engineer at JG Afrika is the recipient of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE) Graduate Engineer of the Year Award for 2020.

Ballim aspired to be an engineer with the hope of doing work that will make tangible improvements to people’s quality of life. A caring person, she was Head Peer Counsellor in Grade 12, and it was her passionate geography teacher who sparked a love of the subject, coupled with her love of mathematics, that inspired her to pursue studies in a field that combined these areas.

‘Engineering is in essence about helping people and giving back to the community,’ she said.

Ballim was also inspired by her father Mr Faisal Ballim, a long-time employee of UKZN’s Campus Management Services in Pietermaritzburg who undertook his own engineering and design projects and exposed his children to engineering shows and programmes. Her family’s penchant for outdoor adventures and holidays that included camping, hiking and travelling around South Africa motivated Ballim to seek a career where she could interact with her environment and different people, an opportunity afforded by the project-based nature of a career in civil engineering.

A bursary from JG Afrika enabled the Pietermaritzburg Girls’ High School alumnus to pursue her degree in Civil Engineering at UKZN, and she undertook vacation work in the organisation’s water and geotechnical units. Ballim received three prizes in her final year: the Joint Structural Division of the SAICE and Institution of Structural Engineering Prize, the K Knight Prize for the Highest Academic Merit in Geotechnical Engineering, and the JR Daymond Prize for the Highest Academic Merit in Water and Environmental Engineering.

After graduating with her Civil Engineering degree cum laude in 2018, Ballim was employed as a graduate engineer at JG Afrika. She credits the firm for supporting and training her throughout her studies and final year project, and for providing a welcoming, professional environment. She is also the vice-chairperson of the SAICE Pietermaritzburg branch, where she focuses on visiting schools to promote careers in Engineering.

Her capability in undertaking ‘complex and innovative designs’, and aptitude for managing and mentoring fellow project team members, as well as her maturity and development as a graduate engineer, impressed her employers and the SAICE, garnering her the Graduate Engineer of the Year Award. Ballim is the first recipient of this new, national award.

‘Respected by her managers, colleagues and JG Afrika’s clients, she has a thorough understanding of technical and social project dynamics within the context of a design team and client interactions,’ read a statement from JG Afrika.

Ballim also paid tribute to UKZN’s Dr Elena Friedrich, Mrs Ooma Chetty and Dr Christina McLeod for their support in her journey to complete her degree, sharing credit for her award with them.

Spurred on by the award and supported by JG Afrika, Ballim enrolled for UKZN’s coursework Masters in Waste and Resources Management, and is excited about applying her experience and acquiring more skills to deal with waste, particularly water resources for environmental and social benefit. She is focusing on understanding the barriers to the implementation of waste management in municipalities in KwaZulu-Natal.

Passionate about seeing women succeed in engineering, Ballim encourages prospective engineers to not fear asking questions, to speak up, to look to strong female role models, and to care for themselves and their wellbeing.

Words: Christine Cuénod

Photograph: Supplied


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2021 Autumn Graduation Prize Winners

2021 Autumn Graduation Prize Winners
Winners Mr Blessing Mazibuko (far left) and Ms Nolwandle Duma (middle) with Mr Muhle Ndwalane (left) Ms Nomvuselelo Myende (right).

On 5 July, UKZN presented its two Autumn Graduation prize winners with gifts that aim to boost their prospective careers and development.

The University hosted two competitions during the 2021 Autumn Graduation to create excitement around its Graduation ceremonies despite the fact that they were hosted virtually due to the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions.

In the first competition graduates were invited through UKZN social media platforms to share their AT-HOME GRAD CEREMONY celebrations. To enter they had to tag the University in their Facebook, Twitter and Instagram posts, and these were reposted. Many people entered, showing off their finest graduation looks, and sharing their inspirational stories and celebrations with families and friends. Winner, Mr Blessing Mazibuko, celebrated with an inspirational song titled Usebenzile, which was well received by social media users. He received an Apple Mac Book courtesy of UKZN to accelerate his growth as a producer and recording artist and to assist with content creation and graphic design in his current job at SaluteCX.

Mazibuko was born in Mpumalanga township, Hammarsdale, and was raised by his grandmother and grandfather after the passing of his mother at a very young age. He matriculated at Uxolophambili High School in Hammarsdale in 2013. In 2014, he enrolled for a Bachelor of Commerce at UKZN. Due to financial difficulties, he was forced to abandon his studies, but returned in 2016 and graduated with a Bachelor of Education. ‘I saw posts online saying we wouldn’t have a graduation ceremony like last year,’ he said. ‘I felt I had to do something and the song just came to me spontaneously. I wrote it, produced it and recorded it.’

Asked how his family feels about his academic achievement, he said, ‘uGogo ujabule kakhulu. My grandma is my everything. When I was financially excluded she encouraged me not to lose hope. The rest of the family are proud of me but my grandma is over the moon.’

Mazibuko is in the process of establishing Highlight Academy that offers tutorials and services for those looking to create digital content. He also has a graphics and videography company, Benedictions Visuals and many plans for his music. On 9 July, he dropped the song, Usebenzile on YouTube. Free downloads can be found on his pages (@blessyess_ for Twitter, Instagram and Facebook and BlessYes for YouTube and TikTok).

The second competition aimed to promote a culture of entrepreneurship and was sponsored by UKZN suppliers, Asante Solutions, a company founded by alumnus Mr Muhle Ndwalane. Graduates were asked to share on social media how they were planning to continue to Inspire Greatness as full-time entrepreneurs following their graduation.

Winner, Ms Nolwandle Duma, received a R15 000 Business Starter Kit that will enable her to build a fully-fledged digital presence to successfully launch her venture.

Duma was born and raised in Sobantu Village, Pietermaritzburg. Her mother passed away when she was five and she was taken care of by her older sister, grandmother and late aunt. ‘From a very young age I always wanted to change the living conditions at home,’ she said. ‘I developed an interest in becoming an independent business woman because my aunt ran a shebeen and always made sure we didn’t go to bed on an empty stomach.’ She was awarded a Bachelor of Social Science (History and Political Science) by UKZN in 2019. She opened a hair and beauty salon, but lacked sufficient resources to continue. Since 2020, Duma has worked with Wukina Network Marketing Business, selling and delivering weaves.

She described her prize as, ‘the breakthrough I have been praying for, as I can kickstart my business again. All thanks to Asante Solutions and UKZN for giving me such an opportunity.’ Duma added that, as the first graduate in her family, they are extremely proud of her.

UKZN’s Corporate Relations team represented by Mrs Thandiwe Zama and Mr Langa Mathe worked with the Asante Solutions team comprising of Mr Muhle Ndwalane, presenter Ms Nomvuselelo Myende, photographer Mr Siyabonga Ngcobo and videographer Mr France Myeza to put together a wonderful gifting experience for the winners, while professional dancer Mr Jabu Nxumalo and his photographer added fun and flavour with his dance moves.

Words: Langa Mathe

Photographs: Supplied


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Promoting New Value Chains for Neglected and Underutilised Crops

Promoting New Value Chains for Neglected and Underutilised Crops
Swayimane farmers at a sample and evaluation meeting at SAVE Hyper’s Pietermaritzburg store and Amadumbe - Taro (bottom left) and Ubhatata - Sweet potato (top right).

Researchers in the Umngeni Resilience Project (URP) are working with small-scale farmers in Swayimane and Nhlazuka, north of Pietermaritzburg, as well as retail outlets for agricultural produce to highlight some of the challenges and opportunities for marketing underutilised crops in KwaZulu-Natal.

The URP is a partnership between the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF), the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI), uMgungundlovu District Municipality (UMDM) and UKZN’s Centre for Transformative Agricultural and Food Systems (CTAFS).

The Project focuses on reducing vulnerability and increasing resilience to the impacts of climate change, particularly in rural communities. This includes the promotion of neglected and underutilised crop species such as taro and sweet potato.

With 5% of the world’s 400 000 plant species classified as edible, 150 species are commercialised but only three - maize, wheat and rice - are used to meet 50% of people’s daily nutritional requirements. If marketed effectively, several underutilised crops could provide essential nutrients, unlock new value chains, and promote sustainable agriculture within South Africa, especially for resource-poor households.

Underutilised crops commonly cultivated in Swayimane and Nhlazuka include imbuya (amaranth leaves), amadumbe (taro) and ubhatata (sweet potatoes), with farmers choosing these crops because they are easier to cultivate than commercial crops like cabbage and onions, require fewer inputs, and have been grown for generations.

Small-scale farmers focus their postharvest techniques and value addition on exotic crops like cabbage, spinach and potatoes, and are well-versed in the production, processing, and trade of these crops rather than underutilised crops. Many underutilised crops are produced and stored traditionally, with methods differing between households, possibly contributing to their value chain remaining underdeveloped.

Farmers grow underutilised crops for household consumption, selling the excess to neighbours, local grocery stores and informal vendors for any price they can get. Swayimane farmers sell their amadumbe and ubhatata in Pietermaritzburg and through vegetable vendors and fresh food markets in eThekwini by way of “bakkie” traders. Nhlazuka farmers only sell their produce locally, but reserve imbuya for free exchange as these are regarded as natural plants that should not be charged for, formerly even being considered weeds.

Despite the nutritional value of underutilised crops, retailers and agro-dealers do not experience high demand for them, forecasting low profit from their sale. Amadumbe and ubhatata are sold by some supermarkets, but underutilised crops are largely seen as a risk to profit margins.

Perceptions and attitudes significantly affect what consumers purchase, an important factor in promoting and normalising these crops. Underutilised crops shift between being perceived as low-income food security crops, and healthy, nutrient-dense ones that can diversify diets.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, one supermarket remarked that while consumer behaviour was thriftier, some of their customers wanted to eat more healthily and were more willing to purchase underutilised crops.

A major challenge facing increased utilisation of underutilised crops is poorly developed value chains and marketing channels. The URP has assisted emerging farmers with production through purchasing inputs and training on plant techniques, protecting crops from pests and diseases, the use of alternative organic fertilisers, post-harvest techniques, agricultural business skills, tunnel production and crop production climate change mitigation strategies, and other advice.

This has resulted in higher yields, maximised land use, improved record keeping, and changed perceptions and attitudes towards these marginalised crops. Working together, the URP and emerging farmers have supplied Pietermaritzburg’s SAVE Hyper supermarket stores with taro and sweet potato twice a week.

Words: Nomfundo Shelembe

Photograph: Supplied


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Academic Appointed to Technical Working Group on Resolving Insolvency

Academic Appointed to Technical Working Group on Resolving Insolvency
Academic Leader in the School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Professor Rajendra Rajaram.Click here for isiZulu version

Professor Rajendra Rajaram, Academic Leader in the School of Accounting, Economics and Finance has been appointed a member of the Technical Working Group on Resolving Insolvency under the Ease of Doing Business Programme.

The programme is championed and co-chaired by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition and National Treasury with oversight by the Presidency. The World Bank is also involved in the programme.

The objectives of the Working Group are (1) raising awareness of the reorganisation (business rescue) proceedings among stakeholders in order for them to be considered as a viable option; (2) adopting a set of non-binding principles outside the ambit of the courts to be utilised by debtors and creditors; (3) considering streamlining as well as adding cohesion to the current framework; (4) the reorganisation of business rescue proceedings in light of the best practices regarding creditors’ rights, and (5) enhancing efficiency and streamlining procedural requirements.

‘The Unit aims to enhance our economy by improving the chances of successful business rescue. We intend to achieve this by, amongst other things, ongoing research and delivery of short courses on business rescue,’ said Rajaram.

Congratulating Rajaram on this achievement, Dean and Head of the School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Professor Mabutho Sibanda said, ‘We are excited as a School about Professor Rajaram’s appointment as a member of the Technical Working Group on Resolving Insolvency. We wish him well in empowering the nation in that space.’

Words: Lungile Ngubelanga

Photograph: Supplied


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UKZN Alumnus Among the Top 30 Miss SA 2021 Finalists

UKZN Alumnus Among the Top 30 Miss SA 2021 Finalists
UKZN alumnus, Ms Tshegofatso Molefe.Click here for isiZulu version

UKZN alumnus, Ms Tshegofatso Molefe (26) aims to prove that there is more to being a pageant queen than just being beautiful.

Molefe, who holds a Bachelor of Laws degree from UKZN, is from Kestell in the Free State, but currently lives in Pietermaritzburg.

The Miss South Africa competition is a leadership platform for ambitious young South African women. Through the pageant process, contestants receive coaching from world-renowned experts and acquire advanced networking, business and life skills.

‘This has been a lifelong dream and I’m so grateful that my life has finally come full circle to this moment. I have always wanted to win Miss South Africa, not just enter but win. I’m ready to work diligently towards the crown. Miss SA is not a typical pageant; it is an empowerment platform that takes place in the form of a pageant. I’m here to learn, get empowered and to empower!’ she said.

‘Inspired by my compassion for my country and my active contribution to society through law and mentorship, there is nothing I want more than to live a purposeful life and to leave a formidable legacy,’ she said.

She started modelling at a very young age and has won numerous pageants including Miss Mgungundlovu 2014, Miss Spring 2014, Miss Edendale Mall 2014, and Miss Mamelodi Sundowns 2019/20. In her final-year of LLB studies, she made the finals of Miss Justice South Africa.

Molefe also runs an organisation called Rising Girls Foundation that donates sanitary pads and provides mentorship to young girls. In 2017, she was appointed the first female Treasurer of the Black Lawyers Association Student Chapter and says this experience inspired her to work relentlessly for community empowerment.

She recently completed her articles at Legal Aid South Africa and is working towards being admitted as an Attorney of the High Court.

Words: Lungile Ngubelanga

Photograph: Supplied


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Durban International Film Festival Announces Opening and Closing Films

Durban International Film Festival Announces Opening and Closing Films
DIFF Opening and Closing Night films, The Eagle’s Nest (left) and Threshold.

The Centre for Creative Arts (CCA) within the College of Humanities will host the Durban International Festival (DIFF) from 22 July to 1 August 2021. Now celebrating its 42nd year, the festival will screen selected films and host seminars and workshops, all virtually.

This year’s opening film is The Eagle’s Nest, an action-thriller directed by award-winning Cameroonian born British-based Olivier Assoua that is set in Africa and addresses migration and poverty. During a night of debauchery, best friends Paris and Samantha discover five million dollars. Later, a thief breaks into Paris’ house, kills her mother, her sister and leaves her for dead. When she recovers, with the help of Samantha, Paris sets off on a quest to find answers. What begins as a search for the truth quickly turns into violence and disturbing revelations. In a world of lies, deceit and betrayal, will they be able to uncover the identity of the murderer?

According to Head of Programming Ms Chipo Zhou, this film was chosen to open the festival because it is a topical critique of current emigration politics and tells a tale that is highly accessible from an African perspective. ‘It raises questions on the brain drain and how to make the continent habitable for future generations. It deals with genuine social issues around the trafficking of Africans, a reminder of the not so forgotten slave trade. It addresses emigration, which has had a significant impact on the continent in recent years. The younger generations are born into poverty with fantasies of a better life abroad. We're looking forward to the discussions that will no doubt ensue after the screening of the film,’ she said.

Assoua commented, ‘I am thrilled and honoured to present the opening film of this year’s Durban International Film Festival. It is such a privilege to be following in the footsteps of the talented filmmakers who came before me. My movie, The Eagle’s Nest, is an honest take on the politics of modern-day immigration and persistent rural poverty in Africa. My aim was to shed light on those issues and be part of the solution by offering a platform for young Africans to gain new skills in front of and behind the camera. I hope this film will entertain viewers as well as bring my vision to light.’

The closing film Threshold is an autobiographical documentary by Brazilian director Corarci Ruiz that focuses on a mother who follows the gender transition of her adolescent son. She interviews him between 2016 and 2019, addressing the conflicts, certainties and uncertainties that pervade him in a deep search for his identity. At the same time, the mother, revealed through first-person narration and by her voice behind the camera that talks to her son, also goes through a process of transformation required by the situation that life presents her with, by breaking old paradigms, facing fears, and dismantling prejudices.

Community film screenings, school programmes and engagement with various community organisations around the city of Durban will be the pulse of this year’s Isiphethu industry-focused programme at the DIFF. A range of top facilitators, guest speakers and participants will be featured. They will headline several of these programmes as the DIFF continues to position itself as one of the continent’s biggest and most significant festivals.

The entire programme, alongside all the films that will be screening, is available here.

Tickets for the virtual screenings are free and open through a booking system two days ahead of the event.

The 42nd edition of the festival is organised by the CCA with the support of the KwaZulu-Natal Film Commission, National Film and Video Foundation, National Arts Council and the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Arts and Culture.

Words: Melissa Mungroo

Photographs: Supplied


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Academic Presents Research at Intercultural Education Society of Japan

Academic Presents Research at Intercultural Education Society of Japan
Professor Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan.

Education academic Professor Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan presented her work at the Intercultural Education Society of Japan (IESJ) Research Seminar Series. Her presentation was on Self-Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices in South Africa.

The IESJ was established in 1981 as an educational research community to study cultural differences in education. Its members have diverse academic backgrounds, including psychology, sociology, ethnology, linguistic, international relations, and literature. Their research interests include identity, bilingualism, cross-cultural communication, and teacher education. 

The seminar focused on Self-Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices and was arranged on behalf of the Research Committee of the IESJ by Professor Masahiro Saito of Asahikawa University. It was chaired by Professor Tatsuya Hirai of Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University.

Pithouse-Morgan said of her research, ‘Self-study methodology emerged from ground-breaking work done in the early 1990s by a group of teacher educators who founded the Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices (S-STEP) special interest group of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). Since then, the field of self-study research and the self-study research community have continued to evolve and grow. In taking a self-study research stance, teacher educators, teachers, and other professionals look critically and creatively at themselves to reimagine their own practice to contribute to others’ well-being.’

Pithouse-Morgan is a teacher educator who facilitates and teaches self-study research in South Africa and internationally. ‘Working individually and with other colleagues, I support and guide communities of university educators, teachers, and postgraduate students who are interested in learning about and enacting self-study research.’

Her presentation offered four exemplars of recently completed self-study research by school teachers she supervised for their doctoral studies: Dr Khulekani LuthuliDr Ntokozo Mkhize, Mr S’phiwe Madondo, and Dr Nontuthuko Phewa. These teachers came from different school contexts but worked together as critical friends to support one another’s self-study research processes. The four exemplars demonstrate why and how teacher-researchers in South Africa are taking up self-study to improve their professional practice and contribute to educational change.

Luthuli’s self-study project was conducted to explore his mentoring as a deputy school principal and improve his mentoring practice to guide novice teachers on positive learner behaviour support. Mkhize studied social and emotional learning in her Grade 4 classroom at an urban primary school. Madondo explored children’s popular culture as a resource for teaching and learning English creative writing in his Grade 6 class in a semi-rural area, serving an isiZulu-speaking community. Phewa studied playful pedagogy as a valuable teaching and learning approach in her under-resourced Grade 1 classroom in a semi-urban area.

‘As illustrated by the four exemplars, teachers’ self-study research is valuable because self-study entails studying the impact on the self and the effects of this work with others and for others. This presentation offered inspiration to teachers and teacher educators from another context by sharing exemplars from teacher-researchers in South Africa,’ explained Pithouse-Morgan.

‘The exemplars show how self-study has opened a platform for teachers to explore and bring forth the important social and schooling issues of equity and care. They demonstrate how teacher-researchers can become a potent force for context-appropriate, practitioner-led educational and social development through self-study. By sharing their research, the teachers who authored the exemplars can teach others about responding to social justice issues in education,’ she said.

Words: Melissa Mungroo

Photograph: Supplied 


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Management Development Redefined

Management Development Redefined
Promoting effective management development.

The global COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need to reshape how managers operate. Leading in an office and leading from home require different sets of skills. Leaders require the necessary skills to ensure that their organisations remain on track. At the same time, they have to address the needs of their teams that are working under very different conditions.

While most leaders have faced challenges and moments of crisis at some point in their career, the COVID-19 crisis is different from anything they have faced before. Effective leadership during a prolonged crisis requires physical, psychological, and emotional prowess. It is essential for management to adjust and respond to unforeseen challenges in their organisation and business environment.

UKZN Extended Learning’s Management Development Programme cultivates thoughtful leadership that will be able to respond to this significant shift in operational priorities. Its blended learning methodology provides a platform for discussions among industry experts and academics, providing each delegate with personal and professional tools to strengthen their effectiveness as a manager and a leader.

Registration is now open for the Management Development Programme commencing on 21 July. To secure a place or for more information, click here or contact:

Thobeka Malinga
T: +27 31 260 1234
E: MalingaT1@ukzn.ac.za 

Words: Nkosingiphile Ntshangase

Photograph: Supplied 


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