Obengumsizi Wasekhaya Wesikhashana Uthole Iziqu Zobudokotela

Obengumsizi Wasekhaya Wesikhashana Uthole Iziqu Zobudokotela
U-Pamela Sithole ubenza izifundo zakhe eNyuvesi yaKwaZulu-Natal eSikoleni Sezifundo Zokwelapha i-Nelson R Mandela futhi esebenza njengomsizi wasekhaya.

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Ngesikhathi engumfundi, uPamela Sithole ubenza izifundo zakhe eNyuvesi yaKwaZulu-Natal eSikoleni Sezifundo Zokwelapha i-Nelson R Mandela futhi esebenza njengomsizi wasekhaya. Ukusebenza kwakhe kanzima kube nomphumela omuhle ngenkathi ephothula iziqu zakhe ngokuphuma phambili emkhakheni Wesayensi Yezesikhumba.

‘Bengihlale ngisebenza kanzima kodwa bengingakholwa ukuthi ngiphume phambili. Ngiyaziqhenya ngokuphumelela kwami yize noma bengibhekene nezinselelo eziningi ngisafunda esikoleni sezokwelapha,’ kusho uSithole obephuphuma intokozo emva kokuthweswa iziqu.

UPamela owase-Phoenix futhi usohlelweni lokuqeqeshwa esibhedlela i-Helen Joseph ne-Rahima Moosa Mother and Child Hospitals eGoli.

Uthe ubesebenza njalo uma enesikhathi futhi esebenzisa iholo lakhe ukuze athenge izidingo ezifana nezingubo nokokugcoba. Uma ontanga bakhe beya emaholidini sekuvalwe izikole, uPamela wayechitha amaholidi akhe esebenza kumqashi wakhe, u-Val Shirley.

USithole oneminyaka engama-25 ukhulele emndenini wabane lapho bebekhuliswa umama ohlukanisile. Abanye abantwana bakubo baphoqeleka ukuthi basebenze ukuze bondle umndeni ngoba nomama wabo ubesebenza imisebenzi engatheni.

Exoxa ngomlando wakhe, uthe ukuzithoba kwakhe okumenze ukuthi enze umsebenzi abanye abawubukela phansi. Wayezazi ukuthi ufunani, wayefuna into ezomenza azizwe engumuntu ophilile futhi owenza umehluko, futhi into eyayizofeza iphupho lakhe kwakuwukuba udokotela.

‘Ungakubukeli phansi ukuqala ngokuphila ungenalutho olutheni. Kodwa ungakuvumeli ukuthi kukhombe lapho uzobe ukhona eminyakeni emihlanu noma eyi-10 kusukela manje. NgoNkulunkulu konke kuyenzeka,’ egcizelela.

Amagama: u-Lihle Sosibo 


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Academic Achievements of UKZN Student Leaders Celebrated

Academic Achievements of UKZN Student Leaders Celebrated
UKZN celebrates student leaders who recently graduated.

UKZN acknowledged the academic achievements of student leaders at a celebratory dinner held at the Westville campus on 11 May 2018.

Senior Lecturer in Development Studies, Dr Mvuselelo Ngcoya, commended the students on their achievements. His keynote address, titled The Thing is Not the Thing saw Ngcoya weave a tale using vignettes to illustrate what ‘the important things are.’

Capturing the attention of the audience, he told of a landlord he had once met for whom degree certificates were of the utmost importance and another tale revealed an old man’s talent for whittling wood into works of art, in this case, a block of wood shaped into a lion. ‘The lion eventually emerges, just keep chipping away,’ said Ngcoya.

Central SRC President, Mr Sandile Zondi, congratulated his fellow student leaders from the SRC and clubs and societies on graduating. ‘We sacrifice for students, it’s not an easy task,’ he said.

Zondi encouraged student leaders to excel in their academic studies and to ‘dismantle the stereotype’ that student leaders do not graduate. ‘If you are a leader, you must lead by example,’ he said.

He emphasised the importance of remembering one’s roots. ‘We are members of the community before we are students. We must go back and assist our communities,’ he said.

Speaking on behalf of Executive Management, Professor Stephen Mutula applauded the student leaders for being ‘role models who give guidance and counsel.’

Mutula thanked the students for their ‘spirit of engagement,’ their wisdom, competence and strategic leadership. ‘You help to run and manage the University,’ said Mutula.

Executive Director: Student Services, Dr Rose Laka-Mathebula, applauded the student leaders for graduating and reflected on their academic achievements.

She commended the ‘exemplary leaders’ for their dedication to serving the student community while also focusing on their academic studies, which she acknowledged was ‘not an easy achievement.’

Giving the vote of thanks, the SRC’s Ms Ntokomalo Bophela thanked all those who had contributed to the success of the event. She said that being student leaders taught them leadership, negotiating and conflict resolution skills. Quoting human rights activist Malcolm X, she said: ‘Education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today.’

Former SRC member and South African Idols finalist Ms Minenhle Ntuli was the Programme Director, with support from Acting Manager for Student Governance and Leadership, Mr Muzomuhle Mhlongo, while the evening’s entertainment was provided by UKZN Music students, La Canta Rosé.

Words: Raylene Captain-Hasthibeer 

Photograph: Andile Ndlovu


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Imagining the Measure of “Enough”: Opening a Debate from Below

Imagining the Measure of “Enough”: Opening a Debate from Below
From left: Professor Deresh Ramjugernath, Mrs Joyce Myeza, Professor Mbongeni Malaba, Professor Gerry Mare’ and Mr Nazim Gani.

UKZN Emeritus Professor Gerhard (Gerry) Maré recently presented the 25th Alan Paton Lecture at the Pietermaritzburg campus. In the lecture delivered on 10 May and titled: Imagining the Measure of “Enough”: Opening a Debate from Below, Maré argued for a ‘freedom charter of enough’.

Alan Paton’s and Maré’s politics took separate routes in the eighties. Maré’s was one of opposing the ethnic, and class politics of Mangosuthu Buthelezi and his supporters in Inkatha in the wider politics of the country; while Paton’s was aligned with what Buthelezi represented, in South Africa and internationally, a gradualist, capitalist approach to social change. Maré argues that liberalism is most productively approached through the “ambiguous legacy” a description which was argued for by Steven Friedman in 2014, where the value lies in that ‘care for our fellow citizens’, is so often absent from political policy. 

During his lecture Maré invited the guests to join him ‘on a brief journey, one that has thrown him into yet another confrontation within this wonderful and disastrous country we live in, located in a world that humans are destroying at a phenomenal and, by most measures, unstoppable rate’. Maré’s focus is on the immediate reality of local and global inequality. 

He argued that there are multiple obstacles to tackling inequality, and environmental change – they relate to the responsibilities of an inclusive citizenship. Maré stated that firstly, ‘modern capitalism is driven by production for individualised consumption, and not for human need’, and secondly, ‘our embedded ways of thinking is shaped by those in power.’ In his lecture, Maré said ‘inequality and climate change have become unexamined ways of living: inequality is there and sets desirable goals for those with power while those at the bottom live with protest against poverty and its immediate consequences’.

In conclusion, Maré argues that ‘it is only through others that we find our individuality, and it is only through others that we come to appreciate the meaning of values and the value of meaning.’ He claims that ‘our responsibility to this amazing planet is to reject the meanings that the powerful create for us’.

 ‘I do not have answers to the world in which I am lost – except that answers lie in facing the world in its complexity, striving towards understanding, establishing some form of moral compass, also enjoying that state of curiosity without doing harm,’ he said.

Maré taught at the University of Natal Durban and UKZN from 1984 until 2012, where he chaired Sociology, and was Director of the Centres for Industrial and Labour Studies and later of Critical Research on Race and Identity. He has published books on forced removals, ethnic political mobilisation, and race and racialism – the most recent being Declassified: moving beyond the dead end of race in South Africa. His extensive collections of documents and materials on the topics of his primary research have been lodged at the archives of the Alan Paton Centre and Struggle Archives since its founding. He is currently a fellow at the Johannesburg Institute for Advanced Study.

Words: Nazim Gani


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Accounting Students Recognised and Rewarded for their Academic Excellence at UKZN – SAICA Students’ Awards Ceremony

Accounting Students Recognised and Rewarded for their Academic Excellence at UKZN – SAICA Students’ Awards Ceremony
School of Accounting, Economics and Finance academics (seated) with the award recipients.

The School of Accounting, Economics and Finance in partnership with the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA) celebrated top achieving students at the annual UKZN – SAICA Students’ Awards Ceremony.

‘Accountants play an important role in society because we rely on financial statements prepared by accountants for every financial decision that we make. At UKZN we have young and dynamic team of qualified chartered accountants that teach in the Accounting programmes which makes us strategically positioned to embrace change and in particular the facets of the fourth industrial revolution. We also have experienced academics who have a wealth of experience needed to blend the Accounting expertise in class and beyond. My desire is to increase the number of 133 CTA’s in 2017 to 200 in the next coming years. We therefore need you top performers to mentor others and also give back to the University by becoming academic trainees because we cannot do this alone,’ said the School’s Dean and Head Professor Mabutho Sibanda.

The School also had another reason to celebrate as UKZN was ranked 7th out of 15 universities in the SAICA Board Examinations after achieving a pass rate of 81% which is an improvement from last year’s 73% pass rate. The test was taken in January and is the first part of two rigorous external examinations that Accounting graduates have to pass in order to qualify as chartered accountants.

Other achievements include UKZN having 114 ITC passes which is sixth highest in the country and having the fourth highest transformation pass rate in the country. Furthermore, UKZN students were ranked third in the country for the Ethics and Auditing question and were placed fourth for Financial Accounting.

Speaking on behalf of SAICA, its Regional Executive Mr Naeem Asvat applauded the Dean and the School for the hard work and interventions they have put in place to achieve this success. He also acknowledged the top achievers for succeeding despite challenges and their parents for supporting them and said he is looking forward to the valuable contribution that these students are going to be making in the industry.

Top honours went to the overall top achiever Mr Ahmed Alley who was awarded the best overall third year students in 2016 and best Postgraduate Diploma in Accounting (PGDA) student in 2017 which he graduated with distinction. Alley was also ranked third in South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA)’s Initial test of competence (ITC).

‘Firstly, have a plan for your process of studying for the ITC exams. PGDA students usually finish their academic year during October and the board exam is at the end of January. There is plenty of time and one might procrastinate and delay their preparations for the exams. This is where a study plan will intervene and having one will ensure you make the best use of your time. Hopefully, this achievement is a stepping stone towards greater things in the future. The achievement is a motivating factor in my life, as it proves that I can achieve anything I set my mind on,’ said Alley.

Auditor-General of South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal Senior Manager Amanda Zuma advised students to be accountants with ethics and integrity.

‘With everything that is currently going on in the Accounting profession, I am really worried about the profession but when I look at the calibre of students produced by UKZN a part of me says don’t worry, the future of the profession is in good hands. I would like to challenge the top achievers to ensure that their journey does not end here and you are not just CA’s or number crunchers but professionals who will ensure that in years to come that the profession is sustainable,’ said Zuma.

The Auditor General of South Africa also sponsored the event.

Accounting Programmes Co-ordinator and academic leader of Taxation, Dr Suren Pillay attributed the achievement to dedicated staff and students and applauded everyone who played a role in the process. He further put an end to speculation about the SAICA accreditation status by affirming that the School has retained its level 2 accreditation and is hopeful that it will attain its goal of achieving a level one ranking for their Accounting programmes.

Prizes were sponsored by SAICA and accounting firm Ernst & Young and Standard Bank which sponsored the event and utilised the awards ceremony to engage with students on employment opportunities.

Words: Thandiwe Jumo


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Architecture Students Design and Build Chicken Coops for Green Camp Gallery Project

Architecture Students Design and Build Chicken Coops for Green Camp Gallery Project
Architecture students seen with their chicken coops, created for the Green Camp gallery project.

First-year Architecture students recently showcased chicken coops designed and built by the student teams for the Green Camp gallery project.

Green Camp is an organic urban lifestyle and design hub in Durban. The once derelict and abandoned area was transformed by artist Mr Xolani Hlongwa and is now functioning as an art gallery, organic vegetable garden and apparel shop with live installations of urbanity. Live music, poetry readings and backyard cinema screenings have been hosted at the venue. 

Architecture lecturer, Ms Bridget Horner explained that the chicken coop project is part of a relationship they started last year with the Green Camp gallery in Umbilo road. ‘When visiting we noticed hens and chicks but no purpose designed coop and thought making one of these as a first-year Architecture project would be fun, meaningful and purposeful. 

‘Students, grouped into six teams, drew inspiration from architects from around the world in developing their designs and after four weeks of hard work and much learning in the process we now have six exciting coops to display to the University community,’ she said.

The chicken coops, showcased on the Howard College lawns, will be donated to the Green Camp gallery to house their poultry and will contribute towards the camp’s social project.

Student Ms Kekelwa Akombelwa along with her team members designed a rectangular coop made of plywood with easy access for the chickens to enter, exit and roost. ‘We designed something simple with adequate ventilation but also something that is chicken-friendly. This was a great build design concept that challenged us but also made us realise the value of architecture in the world.’

Speaking about teamwork, Ms Chloe Naidoo said, ‘At times, it was challenging because there were conflicting ideas on how to build the coop. We learnt the importance of teamwork and utilising various strengths of the team members but we managed to work together and the project really clarified how important it is to design and build correctly.’

Dean of the School of Built Environment and Development Studies Professor Ernest Khalema was impressed with the chicken coops. ‘Each of these designs shows the hard work put into it by the students. It showcases the amazing talent of our students but also puts the Architecture discipline on the map. Well done to our students and lecturers.’

Words: Melissa Mungroo 


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Cape Parrot Big Birding Day Celebrates its 21st Year

Cape Parrot Big Birding Day Celebrates its 21st Year
Professor Colleen Downs, staff and students from the School of Life Sciences prepare to depart for the Cape Parrot Big Birding Day.

Staff and students from the School of Life Sciences (SLS) recently took part in the landmark twenty-first national Cape Parrot Big Birding Day (CPBBD).

The CPBBD is a national census initiated in 1998 to determine the population trends of the Cape Parrot species.

Professor Colleen Downs is Chair of the Cape Parrot Working Group (CPWG), and has organised the CPBBD since its inception.

‘As the numbers of birds are relatively low, this census is extremely important in highlighting their plight,’ said Downs.

‘Each year the count is particularly important to determine a population estimate and determine if it is stable.’

The Cape Parrot (Poicephalus robustus) is a habitat specialist, and is listed as Endangered. These birds depend on mature Afromontane Yellowwood forest for most of their diet and nesting areas. Currently less than 2% of all South African landscapes comprise of natural forest and only a small proportion of those are Afromontane Yellowwood forests.

Counts took place in over 16 areas across the country, from Limpopo to the Eastern Cape, and covered many areas across KwaZulu-Natal. Counting the birds on one day is important for the reliability of the data, as they are nomadic feeders moving between food areas. Volunteers attempted to identify numbers of males, females and/or juveniles present and were instructed on how to distinguish between the birds, and were tasked with sending any Cape Parrot feathers found on to UKZN for a genetic study being undertaken. Results of the count will be published by the CPWG on its website later in the year.

The event has grown in popularity over the years, and as participation has increased, so have sightings of these rare birds. However, numbers have remained consistent over the past five years, with estimates indicating that there are only around 1 600 Cape Parrots remaining in the wild.

Habitat fragmentation and loss continue through human over-utilisation and degradation, further fragmenting the Cape Parrot’s already disjointed habitat. Researchers are working on identifying and protecting IBAs for the Parrots, especially three key Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA) in Limpopo, KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape. They also face the threat of illegal hunting and capture, and increasing disease concerns as their habitat disappears.

A team of 25 UKZN staff and students counted at the Ngeli forest and the Empesheni forest, spotting over 100 of the birds. Downs assisted in the Gxalingele area with Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (EKZNW) staff from Coleford, where local school children joined in the count.

Funds raised by sale of Woolworths’ Cape Parrot bag, designed for BirdLife South Africa (Birdlife SA) as part of Woolworths’ Good Business Journey, also supported this annual census event and forest research.

In 2015, researchers in SLS published a paper recommending that the Cape Parrot should be conferred the status of a full species. The subsequent reclassification is an important contribution to improving the species’ conservation priority and enabling the planning of conservation management strategies.

Words: Christine Cuénod 

Photograph supplied by Colleen Downs 


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Healing through Music

Healing through Music
Final-year Medical student and aspiring musician - Mr Senzeni Tshuma known as “Dr Senzo”

Final-year Medical student at the Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, Mr Senzeni Tshuma is juggling his MBChB classes with his music like a pro.

With the help of his manager, Vusi Kubeka who also manages Nkomazi FM, Senzeni who goes by the stage name of “Dr Senzo” has already produced four hot singles that he hopes will be officially released sometime next month.

Dear MaryNobody but youHard to move on and the Prodigal Son are of some singles to look forward to. Some of the tracks are already available on YouTube and Facebook.

His interests in music started at a tender age of nine, where he would imitate artists like the late Hugh Masikela, Earl Klugh, and the William’s Brothers during family celebrations, at church, weddings and at parties. His father, Mr Tshuma, bought him a guitar as a birthday present and he never looked back.

Through his music, Tshuma has a vocal ability to take listeners on a journey to a world where freedom and joy meets despair and inequity. Tshuma is a captivating artist who manages to incorporate a variety of flavours into his music with his soulful voice, seamless lyrics and a jazzy beat.

‘I recognised the effect music has on people at a very young age, when crafting my music, I always remember how music can heal, soothe and improve one’s mood. As a young artist, for me performing is about inciting emotional and spiritual change with nothing more than a beat, a melody and a smile,’ he says.

Born in Mpumalanga Province, Tshuma attended Njeyeza High school where he completed his matric and obtained distinctions in Mathematics, Physical Sciences, Geography and Life Orientation.

‘I thank God my Creator, for blessing me with such a wonderful talent and the strength to move on. My supportive mom, Z.P Tshuma, my siblings; Percy, Senzekile and Siyenzeka and the entire Tshuma family. My pastor from Holiness Union Church; Mr M N Magagula has also been very supportive by allowing me to play my music in church. Professor Ncoza Dlova, the Dean at the School of Clinical Medicine has given me the opportunity to showcase my talent and believing in my vision and dream, I am humbled.’

Words by: Lihle Sosibo


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Obstetrics and Gynaecology Head Awarded Prestigious Prize for Clinical Research Publication

Obstetrics and Gynaecology Head Awarded Prestigious Prize for Clinical Research Publication
Professor Motshedisi Sebitloane was honored by the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics and awarded the John J. Sciarra IJGO Prize Paper Award for 2017.

Head of the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department in the College of Health Sciences at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Professor Motshedisi Sebitloane has recently been honored by the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics (IJGO) and awarded the John J. Sciarra IJGO Prize Paper Award for 2017. IJGO is the official journal of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), and established the JJ Sciarra award in 1998 for the purpose of encouraging investigators from low- and middle-income countries to submit their best clinical research articles for publication in the IJGO.

Her publication, co-authored with Professor Jack Moodley and Professor Benn Sartorius, was titled Associations between HIV, Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy, and Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy among Maternal Deaths in South Africa 2011–2013. The publication looked at maternal deaths from hypertensive disorders, and determined associations by HIV infection, with or without the use of HAART.

The paper received an honorable mention from the editors of the IJGO and the Executive Board of FIGO, and was chosen amongst the 76 clinical research articles from low- and middle-income countries published during 2017 that were shortlisted and considered for this prize.

Words by: Lihle Sosibo


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IMF Representative Delivers Lecture on Africa’s Growth Prospects

IMF Representative Delivers Lecture on Africa’s Growth Prospects
Acting College Dean of Research Professor Harold Ngalawa (left) and the Dean of the School of Accounting, Economics and Finance Professor Mabutho Sibanda with Dr Montford Mlachila (centre).

International Monetary Fund (IMF) Senior Resident Representative in South Africa, Dr Montfort Mlachila, recently presented a public lecture titled Private Investment to Rejuvenate Growth in Africa at the Graduate School of Business and Leadership.

The lecture was the first in a series to be hosted by the Macroeconomics Working Group (MWG), a body of economists comprising academic staff and postgraduate students from the School of Accounting, Economics and Finance (SAEF). MWG efforts have also resulted in Mlachila becoming Honorary Research Fellow at the University.

Income trends in sub-Saharan Africa, oil price disturbances, debt vulnerabilities, low rate of private investments, institutional reforms, improving opportunities for profits and additional ways to jump-start private investments were the key points of Mlachila’s talk.

Mlachila stated that growth in sub-Saharan Africa accelerated significantly from the 90s until 2015 when it began stalling.

‘Oil exporting countries and commodity exporters have suffered a lot following fluctuating oil prices and subsequent effects on exchange rates. Poor policy synchronisation has worsened the problem in some countries.

‘Private investment is clearly too low, leading to low economic growth rates relative to other parts of the world. sub-Saharan Africa has also been falling short of attracting foreign direct investment which could support private investment. In South Africa, local companies have been investing abroad more than in the country. We need a conducive macroeconomic environment coupled with quality leadership and good governance to jump-start private investment and attract foreign direct investment and consequently achieve high economic growth,’ explained Mlachila.

MWG founder and College of Law and Management Studies Acting Dean of Research Professor Harold Ngalawa said that having an expert of Machala’s calibre addressing students and academics of contemporary finance and economics is part of the organisation’s commitment to enriching teaching and learning.

‘MWG embraces the University’s position of promoting high quality and high impact research. This is why the organisation is working with the industry to ensure that our research is not only relevant but also of high quality’.

The Dean and Head in the School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Professor Mabutho Sibanda, said that the School’s focus is on macro-economics hence they are looking forward to ensuring that MWG is a unit by the end of the year and a stand-alone entity in future.

Words: Thandiwe Jumo 

Photograph: Albert Hirasen


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Education Academic Showcases New Book at International Symposium

Education Academic Showcases New Book at International Symposium
Professor Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan (third right) with international presenters and participants at the AERA 2018 Symposium.

School of Education Academic, Professor Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan, presented on her eighth edited book during an international symposium at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting in New York recently. 

This prominent annual conference is regarded as the largest gathering of scholars in the educational research field, with approximately 17 000 participants in 2018. At the symposium, Pithouse-Morgan presented along with the four other editors of the recently published book, Teaching, learning, and enacting of self-study methodology: Unraveling a complex interplay (Springer, 2018).

This book offers a collection of original, peer-reviewed studies by scholars working in Belgium, The Netherlands, South Africa, and the United States of America (USA) to develop a knowledge base of teaching and facilitating self-study research methodology.

Further, it details and interconnects perspectives and experiences of new self-study researchers and their facilitators, in self-study communities in different countries and across different continents.

Said Pithouse-Morgan, ‘Overall, this book demonstrates the impact of self-study research and validates the authenticity and generative professional applications of self-study methodology for and beyond teacher education, providing implications and recommendations for practitioners on a global level.’

Pithouse-Morgan and Professor Anastasia Samaras of George Mason University (USA) co-edited a section of the book that extends self-study research across multiple disciplines and across continents. The authors of the chapters of this section are academics from George Mason University and from several South African universities engaged in the Transformative Educational Studies (TES) project.

In addition to her presentation at the symposium, Pithouse-Morgan gave a co-authored paper that offered a collaborative arts-informed analysis of the Transformative Educational Studies (TES) project. Since 2011, the TES project has brought together approximately 40 educators from diverse South African university contexts through face-to-face and online conversations and self-study research that seeks to generate positive change at individual, institutional, and societal levels.

Words: Melissa Mungroo 


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Fourth-Year Nursing Students Engage Radio Listeners on Dementia

Fourth-Year Nursing Students Engage Radio Listeners on Dementia
With radio host Sindi Shezi are: (back from left) Mr Bonginhlanhla Ngubane, Ms Slindile Madela and their lecturers Dr Sipho Mkhize and Mrs Ann Jarvis.

Fourth-year Nursing students; Ms Slindile Madela and Mr Bonginhlanhla Ngubane recently spoke to the Izwilomzansi community radio station about dementia in the context of human rights.

Madela and Ngubane are currently doing their Psychiatric Nursing module and were interviewed by radio host Sindi Shezi on the “Senza Kwenzeke” Show, with the aim of deepening the public’s knowledge of dementia in the elderly.

The interview explored aspects of dementia such as: definition, causes, common signs and symptoms, importance and role of family and community in the management of this disease. Other aspects of dementia that were discussed included the fact that it is a progressive disease with different stages, the importance of accessing treatment, where to find help and human rights of people living with dementia since their rights are sometimes violated . In some communities people who suffer from dementia end up being labelled as witches if they are found wandering at night.

‘Being on the radio was quite an experience and a pleasure, we were very delighted to be given this opportunity. And we were humbled by the great feedback we received,’ said Madela and Ngubane.

They further acknowledged their lecturers Dr Sipho Mkhize, Mrs Ann Jarvis and Mrs Winnie Cele for assisting them to prepare for this interview.

Nursing Discipline Academic Leader, Professor Gugu Mchunu said the station occasionally approaches the Discipline for health issues, ‘for this topic, a decision was taken that students will be given a chance to be interviewed since they are final-year students doing Psychiatric Nursing, and dementia is related to mental health problems.’

Words: Nombuso Dlamini


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KRISP Cautions about Intellectual Property when Fostering Innovation and Entrepreneurship

KRISP Cautions about Intellectual Property when Fostering Innovation and Entrepreneurship
The fourth KRISP breakfast seminar emphasised the importance of Intellectual property in fostering innovation and entrepreneurship.

Understanding Intellectual Property (IP) allows people and businesses to harness creations of the human mind and realise their economic potential through commercialisation. It is important to know what constitutes intellectual property, who owns the intellectual property and what protection and advantages are afforded to intellectual property owners.

This was the focus of the fourth breakfast seminar hosted by the KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform (KRISP). The platform aims to foster partnerships involving academia, industry and government for innovation and entrepreneurship.

During his presentation titled: Life Sciences Intellectual Property a Whirlwind Tour, Advocate Tyron Grant focused on the importance of Intellectual property in innovation and entrepreneurship.

Grant is a South African patent attorney specialising in domestic and international patent matters, particularly in the field of Biotechnology and Life Sciences. He has received an Lexology “Client Choice Award” for South Africa in the “Intellectual Property – Patents” category in 2016 and has over 13 years of experience in this field.

‘Intellectual property and its protection is a key building block in the process of research, development, entrepreneurship and commercialisation,’ he said.

The presentation touched on the types of intellectual property that are available to inventors and start-up businesses, with a specific focus on the benefits of patenting inventions that are produced in the process of research and development with a specific focus on inventions in the field of biotechnology,’ he said.

Businesses are often unaware of the importance of their intellectual property assets. Also because intellectual property is not a physical asset it is often overlooked. Businesses often face challenges when it comes to intellectual property due to the cost of protection of the various types of intellectual property. Businesses often do not have a sound understanding of the patenting process which often results in valuable intellectual property being lost due to public disclosure. Understanding intellectual property goes a long way to ensuring that it is properly protected so that it can be leveraged for commercial purposes.

It is important for a businesses to identify its intellectual property and ensure that it is protected, while balancing the benefit of having a patent, trademark and/or registered design with the costs associated with protection. Many businesses make the mistake of over protecting their intellectual property in markets that they will never enter and/or where the IP will never be exploited.  Businesses should work on the development of an intellectual property strategy which identify key markets for their products and ensure that they protect their IP in the markets that are important to the company.

‘Patenting of biotechnology inventions is critical in capitalising South Africa’s capabilities in science and technology. South African institutions are involved in world-class research and it is important that technology transfer offices are able to identify and protect the products of this research. The importance of intellectual property protection needs to be communicated with inventors while technology transfer officers need to be aware of the formal and procedural aspects of intellectual property protection in order to protect and commercialise these research products,’ he concluded.

Words: Lihle Sosibo 


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Campus HIV and AIDS Support Unit Hosts Flame of Hope

Campus HIV and AIDS Support Unit Hosts Flame of Hope
UKZN hosted Flame of Hope to reflect on those lost to HIV and to prepare for the future.

Flame of Hope, an event to celebrate lives lost to HIV and AIDS, was hosted by UKZN’s Campus HIV and AIDS Support Unit at the Howard College campus.

The HIV and AIDS Programme Director, Ms Nomonde Magantolo, said the event was held to ‘reflect on our past and prepare for our future.’

Magantolo said she was concerned that while HIV and AIDS was preventable, we still get new infections every day. She advised students to reflect – ‘look at yourselves and ask yourself – how are you going to protect yourself from HIV?’

She said UKZN campus clinics are equipped to assist students whether they are HIV negative or positive – the aim was to help students ‘graduate healthy and alive.’ ‘HIV is no longer a death sentence – you can get treatment,’ she said.

Magantolo reminded students to know the status of their partners, to talk openly about HIV and to stay negative or to get treatment if they are positive.

Guest speaker and advocate for TB and HIV vaccine research, Mr Siya Nzimande, reflected on the history of HIV and highlighted those we have lost to HIV, including Nkosi Johnson and Gugu Dlamini, who was stoned to death in 1998 after she revealed her HIV positive status.

Nzimande berated decisions taken by government in the past, saying: ‘How many people died while we were busy eating African potatoes?’

He said the best way to fight HIV is prevention and behavioural change. ‘The choice is yours,’ said Nzimande.

PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) Ambassador and Peer Educator, Mr Kwanele Ngcobo, explained the benefits of PrEP, an anti-HIV medicine that keeps HIV negative people from getting HIV and emphasised consistency in taking the tablets daily. Ngcobo said that while PrEP is safe, ‘using condoms is still the best way to prevent HIV’.

The SRC’s Ms Thandeka Mkhwane stressed the importance of awareness and denounced discrimination based on HIV status. She implored students to ‘hate the disease, not the diseased.’

Entertainment was provided by Thokozani Kojane, Minenhle Mthiyane and the Red light group.

Words: Raylene Captain-Hasthibeer 

Photograph: Albert Hirasen 


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I Believe – A Letter to the Youth

<em>I Believe – A Letter to the Youth</em>
Twenty-year-old UKZN student Mr Thembalethu Mahlangu has penned a motivational book, I Believe.

Third-year UKZN BCom student Mr Thembalethu Mahlangu has penned a motivational book titled I Believe – A Letter to the Youth. The 20-year-old first-time author, who wrote the book in under four months, was compelled to write I Believe to help young people overcome what he refers to as ‘the four monsters of life we face every day’ - dreams, obstacles, failure and success are explored in Mahlangu’s book.

Bookstores have shelves dedicated to motivational books, but Mahlangu realised many are written by “older people”. ‘Most motivational books are written by old people who are from the generations before ours, and who don’t relate to our preferences which is why many young people aren’t interested in reading them,’ he said.

Mahlangu, who is from Umlazi, said he was inspired to write the book to help the youth overcome obstacles after growing in an environment with ‘youth characterised with hopelessness.’

He offered these words of wisdom: ‘Don’t undervalue your dreams and overvalue obstacles. A dream without purpose is not a dream, but a wish that will not drive you to your triumphant destination. Dedication and consistency is required for a dream to be accomplished.’

Writing a book while being a fulltime student is no mean feat! He says other would-be authors should focus on time management to accomplish their goals. ‘We are all given 24 hours a day and it is up to us to honour and make each and every minute count,’ he said.

His immediate plans are to continue his studies at UKZN ‘as this University is a platform for inspiring greatness,’ he said. He plans to donate 10 books to a children’s home and to continue with his pursuit to make a difference in people’s lives.

Mahlangu thanked everyone on his journey to penning I Believe, with special thanks to UKZN Student Development Officer, Mr Mandla Ndaba who mentored him and helped put the book together.

If you would like a copy of I believe, visit Adams Book shop or contact Mahlangu at Ibelievebook1@gmail.com or call 084 857 6216.

Words: Raylene Captain-Hasthibeer 


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Nurses Do it for the Nurses

Nurses Do it for the Nurses
UKZN Nurses’ Day Commemoration.

UKZN’s Nursing Discipline celebrated International Nurses Day (IND) by hosting an event themed Nurses also have a Right to Health. The event was held at the College of Health Sciences’ George Campbell Building at Howard College campus.

The international day is celebrated around the world on 12 May, the anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth, to mark the contributions nurses make to society. The International Council of Nurses (ICN) has celebrated this day since 1965.

Third-year Nursing students together with their lecturers put together a programme that saw all the Nursing academics go through; health assessment, kick-butt exercise, therapeutic relaxation technique and massages.

all the lecturers were screened for; wrist measure, waist circum, hip measure, forearm measure, Weight, BMI and blood pressure by five third-year students at the Discipline’s Skills Lab.

The screening was followed by a 10 minutes kick-butt exercise led by Nursing Lecturer Dr Sipho Mkhize. Mental Health lecturer, Mrs Charlotte Engelbrecht did the therapeutic relaxation technique.

School of Nursing and Public Health Principal Programme Officer, Benina Mkhonto treated the nurses with massages, ranging from head and neck to full body massages.

Nursing academic leader; Professor Gugu Mchunu thanked the students for making the day possible. She encouraged students to read, plan their nursing careers and also think about where they want to be when they are 40. ‘You must learn and leave a footprint where you work,’ advised Mchunu.

The organisers Mkhize and third-year lecturer, Mrs Pretty Mbeje said they were happy to see how their colleagues enjoyed the service. They were also grateful to Mrs Ann Jarvis for designing and creating a health passport for the day.

Mkhize said the idea came about after the South African Nursing Council said, ‘We acknowledge the efforts from nurses in the healthcare environment. However, it has been noted that nurses tend to forget they also have a right to health. That is the reason we have decided to emphasise the importance of nurses’ health in this year’s International Nurses Day by putting more focus on stress and hypertension.’

Words: Nombuso Dlamini 


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Fifth-Year Medical Student Scores SAMSA Scholarship

Fifth-Year Medical Student Scores SAMSA Scholarship
Mr Lindokuhle Dlamini will spend a month studying Cardiology as an elective at Makerere University in Uganda.

‘I believe that this opportunity will not only benefit myself, but the country as a whole,’ an excited Mr Lindokuhle Dlamini remarked upon receiving the South African Medical Association (SAMA) scholarship. The award allows Dlamini to spend a month studying cardiology as an elective at Makerere University in Uganda.

This scholarship will cover travelling costs, meals, accommodation, and touring to various places.

In Uganda he will be taught about Cardiac disease and Cardiac Surgery which will include observing and participating in cardiac procedures and in the management of patients.

The fifth-year Medical student hopes this opportunity will expose him to different patients, specialists and hence broaden his horizons as far as cardiology is concerned.

Born in Nqutu, north of KwaZulu-Natal, the 24-year-old says his passion for Internal Medicine, more especially cardiology is what got him selected for this scholarship.

Words by: Lihle Sosibo


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Empowering Women in Mariannridge

Empowering Women in Mariannridge
The Second Hand Shop open in the Mariannridge community with two of the employees and one OT student.

Fourth-year Occupational Therapy students from UKZN are spearheading renewal in the Mariannridge community as part of their community rehabilitation fieldwork block. On almost every occasion, the OT students have been welcomed with open arms by community members.

Over the years, the community members have come to appreciate the students for helping those with physical and intellectual impairments, mental illnesses and those who have lost hope. The students run many interesting projects in the community, which assist the young to the elderly. The OT students work at the newly built local clinic, screening patients to ensure problems are identified early and that interventions are provided immediately.

They also work in the local creches and schools, providing interventions to children referred by teachers. The students also go into people’s homes providing interventions to those who are too ill or who cannot afford to attend therapy elsewhere. The OT students run projects such as the Gogo’s project, which involves teaching elderly women about health, diet and exercises to maintain a healthy lifestyle, and also provides an opportunity to make some new friends. They run health promotion talks at the clinic, educating community members about diseases and about living a healthy and balanced lifestyle. The OT students also assist in an addiction group, helping community members overcome alcohol and drug addictions.

Another amazing project started by the previous OT students and is being run in the community, is the Women’s Empowerment Project. The project was started to develop skills among the unemployed, disadvantaged women of Mariannridge who are the sole supporters of their families. The project equips participants with skills such as business management, interaction, marketing, administrative and money management. It also serves as a job creation platform as the women earn a small income to support their families while gaining the skills which may eventually lead to employment in an open labour market. The project also allows for women to engage in meaningful occupations and prevents them from engaging in negative and dangerous occupations (such as substance abuse and criminal acts). In total, the project aims to empower women, in a community which for so many years has disempowered women.

The project is a small second hand store, which is set up every Tuesday and Friday, outside the Mariannridge library. The store sells second hand clothing, shoes, books, Tupperware and more. All the stock is donated by local and surrounding churches, by staff and students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal Westville campus, and by families in the Westville area.

Outside the Occupational Therapy Department at the Westville campus is a white bin painted with pictures and the words ‘Women Empowerment Project’. Many people mistake this for a rubbish bin and throw litter in it. However this is where donors can deliver their donations to the project. The women label, price and record all the items donated to be sold. The items are marked between R2 and R20, and sold to the community members. The prices are kept low as this project is providing a service to people of a low economic standing. The women set up the pop-up store on designated selling days and run the business with only guidance from the OT students. The women earn a percentage of the total which goes towards their daily wage, and towards supporting their families.

All the women who are part of the project feel they have meaning back in their lives and have a reason to get up in the morning. It is hoped the project will grow, and more women will be able to join in the empowerment process. However the project can only continue so long as we have donations to sell. Therefore we encourage all UKZN students to donate their old or outdated fashion clothes to the Women Empowerment project. These donations can be placed in the donation bin outside the Occupational Therapy department on Westville campus.

We hope that, these types of amazing projects can continue in the community by not only OT students but by all proactive UKZN students, willing to make a difference in a previously disadvantaged community.

Words: Stacey Petzer 


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Taking Pride in her Job

Taking Pride in her Job
Ms Dudu Mjaja takes pride in her job.

‘I love my job, after all it’s how I earn my living,’ Ms Dudu Mjaja said excitedly after learning of her nomination as an employee that takes pride in her job.

Mjaja who originates in Port-Shepstone, Ezingolweni is employed by the University of KwaZulu-Natal as a cleaner based at the School of Clinical Medicine. She is responsible for cleaning the 4th floor at Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine.

‘Our passages, offices and bathrooms are always spotless, Dudu indeed takes pride in her work,’ said Dean and Head of the School of Medicine, Professor Ncoza Dlova.

Mjaja joined the cleaning service at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in 2016, previously having worked for an outsourced cleaning company for several years.

‘Nothing beats planning your work, keeping to your plans and simply loving what you do,’ she said

Words by: Lihle Sosibo 


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UKZN Alumnus Launches Album at Jazz Centre

UKZN Alumnus Launches Album at Jazz Centre
UKZN alumnus, Ms Zethembiso “Zethe” Mdletshe.

KwaZulu-Natal born songstress and UKZN alumnus, Ms Zethembiso “Zethe” Mdletshe, who shot to fame after winning the grand prize on the Vodacom NXT LVL TV, is ready to take over the music industry with her much-anticipated debut EP titled Qhawekazi.

Ready to give her fans a taste of her work of art, Mdletshe started touring her home province, KwaZulu-Natal from 10 May, starting at The Jazz Joint. The official launch of the EP took place in an intimate event with local celebrities and media at the UKZN Centre for Jazz and Popular Music on 11 May 2018. 

‘I am so excited as I embark on this tour. It will enable me to share my experiences and the importance of self-worth. The EP really focuses on being bold and strong…the characteristics of i- Qhawekazi. I just want everyone to know that and listen to it especially during my electric live performances,’ said Mdletshe.

Since winning the coveted Vodacom NXT LVL season one title, the 24-year-old Music graduate spent the past four months in studio working on her musical masterpiece consisting of five songs. Among them is her debut single called Zazi that dropped on 25 April.

Mdletshe walked away with over a million rands worth of prizes. This included R100 000 in cash, a car worth R300 000, a Public Relations deal worth R250 000, a studio session to finish off her single, a music video for her single, clothing, access to an entertainment lawyer, adoption into the Rocka stable as an ambassador, her own range of music accessories and her EP.

‘I’m still pinching myself. I did not expect to win at all. This has really made me the most grateful person. The way South Africa has really supported me is insane. More than anything, throughout the show, I believed in myself and my craft as tough as it was to keep going. Now I believe even more that if you stay true to who you are, things always work out,’ she said.

Her EP is now available on all digital music platforms.

Words:Melissa Mungroo


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ISikole Sezifundo Zokwelapha e-UKZN sithole Igunya Eligcwele Lokuqhubeka Nokwethula Izifundo Eminye Iminyaka Emihlanu Ezayo

ISikole Sezifundo Zokwelapha e-UKZN sithole Igunya Eligcwele Lokuqhubeka Nokwethula Izifundo Eminye Iminyaka Emihlanu Ezayo
Ithimba labahloli be-HPCSA kanye neSekelashansela lase-UKZN, uDkt Albert Van Jaarsveld.

Click here for English version 

I-Health Professions Council of South Africa (i-HPCSA) isanda kuhlola uhlelo lwezifundo zokwelapha lwase-UKZN yase ilugunyaza ngokugcwele iminyaka emihlanu ezayo.

IKolishi Lezifundo Zezempilo (i-CHS) lithokoze kakhulu ngenxa yokunconywa uMkhandlu ngohlelo lwabo oluphambili lwezokwelapha kanye nohlelokufunda, futhi baphinde bancoma nezinhlaka zabo ezinhle kakhulu, uhlelo lokulekelela abafundi, uhlelo lokuqeqesha olusabalele i-Decentralised Clinical Training programme kanye nokuzilungiselela kwabo ukwamukela abafundi bezokwelapha be-90 Fidel Castro Cuban Collaboration abazongena e-UKZN ekupheleni kuka July.

I-CHS yahalaliselwa ngokuthuthukisa ezokuxhumana, umsebenzi wezokulekelela abafundi, uhlelo lokuhlala emakhaya ezindaweni zasemaphandleni e-KZN, okukhuthaza ukubumbana komphakathi kanye nohlelo lokuqeqesha imitholampilo olusabalele. I-HPCSA iphinde yahlonipha iSikole Sezokwelapha Ngemithi, nezinye zezikole ezithintekayo kuhlelokufunda kwezokwelapha kanye nobuholi nabasebenzi base-CHS ngogqozi nokuzibophezela ekuthuthukiseni uhlelokufunda lwezempilo ngokuqhubekayo.

Inqubo yokugunyaza iziqu iwuhlelo oluqhubekayo njengoba okuqukethwe kuhlelokufunda, futhi kwezinye izikhathi nezibalo eziphokophelwe zokubhalisa kubuye kushintshe ngokuhamba kwesikhathi. Inhloso yalokhu kugunyaza ukukhuthaza ubunyoninco bokulungiselela ukufundisa kube kunikezwa isiqinisekiso emphakathini sokuthi abafundi abaneziqu bazoba nolwazi namakhono angumongo ukuze bakwazi ukusebenza ngokuphephile, ngendlela enenqubonhle, baphinde babe ochwepheshe abazimele emsebenzini wabo.

KwabaseKolishi Lezifundo ZezeMpilo, ukufika kwabazogunyaza kulonyaka kubandakanye nokuhlolwa kwezizinda zohlelo lwe-Decentralised Clinical Training and Primary Healthcare okubalwa isibhedlela i-Queen Nandi (i-Lower Umfolozi) esiseMpangeni, isibhedlela iStanger, isibhedlela i-Edendale kanye neNorthdale eMgungundlovu, i-Cato Manor Clinic kanye ne KwaMashu Community Health Clinic. I-DCTP yanikezwa imvume ekhethekile yokuqhubekela phambili.

Enye inhloso yokufika kwabagunyazayo bekuwukubona ukuthi isikhungo siyakwazi yini ukwandisa umthamo wokubhalisa njengoba kwakuyalele uNgqongqoshe Wezempilo. I-HPCSA ihlola umphumela wokwandisa uthamo wabafundi kuqhathaniswa nezinsiza, nenanisiqhathaniso lothisha-nabafundi, ubukhulu bamalebhu nokusekelwa kwabafundi. Kulomzuliswano, i-HPCSA igunyaze ngokugcwele loluhlelo ukuthi lithathe abafundi abangama-250 bokuqala.

Ukuhlolwa bekulele kakhulu ohlwini lwemibuzo lokuzihlola, athathwayo ahlolisiswe yiqembu elihlolisisayo ebelibheka inhlalanjalo ezimpendulweni zezihloko ezihlanganisa ezokuphatha kuya kwezokwesekwa kwabafundi kanye nokwakheka ngokobuhlanga komthamo wabafundi bonyaka wokuqala nabathola iziqu, izinsiza zokufunda kusetshenziswa uhleloxhumano nezinsiza omtapo wolwazi neqhaza labafundi ekuqokweni kwabasebenzi besikhungo. Abasebenzi Ukwesekwa kwabasebenzi, ukuqeqeshwa kwabasebenzi nokubandakanyeka kwabafundi ocwaningweni nasezindleleni kwenza zalo nakho kuyabhekwa.

IPhini LeSekelashansela Eliyinhloko YeKolishi Lezifundo zezeMpilo, uSolwazi Busisiwe Ncama uthokoze kakhulu ngomphumela, ‘Lokhu kuwumphumela wokusebenzisana njengeqembu kwabo bonke abasebenzi kuhlanganise nemibono yabafundi noMnyango WezeMpilo e-KZN abebesebenzisana nesikhungo. Ngifisa ukubonga wonke umuntu obambe iqhaza ohlelweni lwe-MBCHB ngokuzinikela nokusebenza kwabo kanzima.’

Amagama: uMaryAnn Francis


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UKZN hosts Successful Open Day for Learners

UKZN hosts Successful Open Day for Learners
Prospective students attend UKZN’s Open Day to gain more information about what the University has to offer.

Prospective students, keen to pursue a degree at UKZN, attended the 2018 Undergraduate Information Open Day held at the Westville and Pietermaritzburg campuses recently.

The learners, some accompanied by parents and others by their teachers, were eager to find out more about programmes offered at the University.

Representatives from the University’s four Colleges answered questions from the visitors and offered brochures, pamphlets and information booklets about various study choices.

During the information sessions, students were informed about the admission criteria for entry into the various degree programmes and were made aware of all the available academic opportunities, student funding criteria and student support services.

Matric learners from Ratshisase Secondary School in Matshena, Mutale Rural in Limpopo travelled to Durban to attend the Open Day session and were keen to hear what was on offer at the College of Humanities. ‘UKZN was always my first choice. I want to study Education and become a teacher. I want to make a difference to the lives of learners, just like my teachers have done for me,’ said Ms Tshamano Murendeni.

For her classmate Mr Anitsepe Freddy Manyuha, UKZN was also his first choice. ‘I come from a poor family and to educate myself at university is a blessing. I will do well in matric so I can come here to study Architecture. Being on campus for Open Day has motivated me to succeed. This is my first time in Durban and I am seeing what campus life could be. My parents are very happy that I am choosing to study at university. I will make them proud.’

Students based in the College of Health Sciences wooed the crowds with training in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) as well as free eye, hearing and blood pressure testing. The health screenings provided Grade 12 learners with an insight into the various careers one can pursue when studying a professionally accredited health or Medical degree offered at UKZN.

College of Law and Management Studies Alumnus Mr Siphesihle Mkhize performed an entertaining and educational Mathematics Show for learners at both campuses. ‘Mathematics is key to success as it can be applied to our everyday living, so choose Mathematics for a rewarding career,’ said Mkhize encouraging learners to work hard in order to meet the College entrance requirements.

Academics from the School of Law were there to make the learners aware of many fascinating career areas one could go into once they have obtained a Bachelor of Laws degree while academics from Management Studies unpacked programmes that will enable learners to become successful business leaders. College administrative staff assisted learners and parents with queries related to admissions and funding.

Prospective students visiting the College of Agriculture, Engineering and Science’s exhibits were treated to a programme that included magical scientific displays from Dr Tanja Reinhardt of the Science and Technology Education Centre (STEC), and were exposed to a range of creatures ranging from sheep and goats to snakes and spiders.

‘It’s been an incredible and very successful day,’ said Dean and Head of the School of Life Sciences Professor Ademola Olaniran. ‘I’m impressed with the turnout of the learners, and with the staff and postgraduate students who showcased fun displays for learners to interact with, and gave them helpful advice.’

‘It’s good to introduce kids to science at a very young age, and show them that science is not hard but can be fun and interesting,’ said UKZN staff member Ms Hazel Langa. ‘I’m from the College of Law and Management, but I thought that I should bring my kids and let them see the fun scientific displays.’

Words: UKZNteam

Photographs: UKZNteam 


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